HOMEGROWN LOCAL FOOD COOPERATIVE

Homegrown Local Food Cooperative is your resource for locally grown organic produce, pastured eggs and meats, raw dairy, honey and a variety of artisanal goods for the home and garden.  

Homegrown goods are available every week through our Signature Online Farmer's Market.  Simply log in, shop and pick-up your local goods at our boutique farm store on Orange Avenue where Ivanhoe and Health Villages connect.

Our local Farmer's list what's growing each week and you get to pick what farm fresh goodies you want and, they are harvested just for you!

Our local Artisans cook and prepare to order what you have requested.

Quality and transparency are important at Homegrown, and you can shop with ease, knowing that we are looking out for the best tasting, healthiest, most nutritionally packed, unadulterated, local food available.  At Homegrown our goal is to source the best quality food grown as close to home as possible.


Our produce is grown without pesticides, fungicides, or synthetic fertilizers and never from GMO seeds!  Our animal products come from animals who are treated humanely and do not receive routine hormones or antibiotics.  Our artisanal  food products are made without preservatives or artificial ingredients.  Our artisanal home products are made without parabens or sulfates.  Our garden products come from our local organic farmers.  

Each product listed at our Online Farmer's Market is identified by the farm, kitchen or craftsman who is creating the unique offering.  To learn more about our Producers, visit the Producers section.

 

Online Farmer's Market Hours:
Tuesday at 9am through Friday at 9am

Boutique Farm Store Hours:
Saturday and Sunday from noon until 4:00pm and Monday from 2:00pm until 7:00pm

 

We accept cash, check, ebt and all major credit cards. 

Food School: Local vs Organic

  • Homegrown Lounge 2310 N Orange Ave Orlando, FL, 32804 United States

Join us for our third session of Food School.  This week will conquer the topic of Organic vs. Local.  Here is an article from the Organic Consumer’s Association and their take on the subject.

Organic and Local: Still the Gold Standard

By Ronnie Cummins and Katherine Paul Organic Consumers Association,

October 9, 2014

“In 2011, we wrote an article exposing the then-popular trend in food marketing—promoting "local" foods as "sustainable," "healthy" or "natural," even when they weren’t.

As we wrote at the time, “local” often means nothing more than food that has been sourced from within a prescribed geographic area. (According to Walmart and Big Food, “local” refers to anything produced within a 400-mile radius). But because a growing number of conscientious consumers actively seek out the “local” label—and are willing to pay a premium for it—corporations routinely co-opt the term so they can sell more product, at higher prices, in order to increase profit margins by promising (but not actually delivering) added value.

Fast forward a couple of years, and we see that sales of “local” food are still on the rise, as are sales of “natural” and more recently, “Non-GMO” foods. And today, just as they were a few years ago, consumers are still being duped by corporations that use these labels to pass off products as something they aren’t.

The fact is, none of these labels—local, natural or non-GMO—on its own provide a guarantee that the food behind the label is either healthy, sustainable or natural. There is only one food label that provides that guarantee: USDA Organic. And because organic food sourced locally is not only healthy, sustainable and natural, but also supports small farmers and contributes to strong communities, today’s Gold Standard for the health-conscious and environmentally and socially concerned consumer is USDA organic and local.”

For the entire article: http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_31136.cfm


Food School is an ongoing series that explores what food is, where it comes from and how to prepare it. Food school is held every first and third Sunday of the month at 4PM. 

Know your food, know your farmers, and know your kitchen
— Joel Salatin